Startpage-MarkInfo
Svenska
Information
Climate
SoilGeneral
Land use classes
Soil type
Soil parent material
Soil depth
Surface boulder frequency
Humus layer
Bedrock
Lateral soil water movement
Pictures
Definition
Dominating class of lateral soil water movement
Missing
Shorter periods
Longer periods
Soil moisture
Mineral
SoilChemistry
Vegetation
SLU (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)Webmap over MarkInfoDepartment of Forest Soils -HomepageContact

17/3/2006

Definition

Lateral soil water

Sites with laterally soil water movement often have a high production capacity. The water that flows down slope in different layers and at irregular intervals furnishes water and may provide nutrients in favour for vegetation further down the slope. Soil water movement can also improve the availability of oxygen in the rootzone, resulting in considerably better production conditions than when the water is stagnant, particularly in wet soils.

The potential for lateral soil water movement is assessed with the help of data on the topographical gradient and the length of the slope above the site location. Historically, four classes were used but currently there are three. The two classes "missing" and "rarely" have been merged into one class, i.e. "missing". These three classes are named "missing"; shorter (periods); and longer (periods), respectively. For the classes "shorter" and "longer", the soil moisture class cannot be ’dry‘ even if the groundwater level is deeper than 2 m.

Principle outline over how variable lateral soil water movement will be found in the terrain.

Outline showing how the classes for surface/subsurface water flow are assessed

 

Top

Search this site
Search the Web
Google
Information Climate SoilGeneral SoilChemistry Vegetation